The central moment of our worship is the celebration of Holy Eucharist (also called "Communion," "The Lord's Supper" or “Mass” by some Episcopalians). Eucharist is a Greek word meaning “thanksgiving”. The first part of the liturgy consists of hymns, prayers, scripture readings and a sermon. This is followed by an Affirmation of Faith (The Nicene Creed), the prayers of the people, confession of sin, absolution, and the exchange of peace. The second part of the liturgy begins with the offerings of the congregation, and then proceeds with the Eucharistic prayer, consecration of the bread and wine, Communion, the post-Communion prayer, blessing and dismissal.   All persons--no matter the age or denomination--are welcome to receive communion. 
Music and Worship
Several groups contribute to worship services and the Music and Worship Committee meets to coordinate these groups, discuss input and feedback regarding our common worship and plan for changes in services at the beginning of church seasons. Members of the committee are the committee convener, the Rector, the Altar Guild Coordinator, the organist, the senior choir, and the Eucharistic Minister (EM) scheduler. Meetings are open to all and the committee invites participation from St. Andrew’s parishioners.

Choir 
Adults and older youth are welcome to participate in St. Andrew’s Choir. This group learns fine sacred choral literature and is dedicated to excellent leadership of our worship at St. Andrews. In addition to singing for the 10:00 service each Sunday (except the first Sunday of the month), the Choir also participates in many special liturgies and programs throughout the year such as: Christmas Eve prelude music, Holy Week and Easter services.

Janice Snyder - Organist 

After the opening procession has concluded and the celebrant and other participants in the service are in their places, the service formally begins with the "Opening Acclamation and Response", the "Collect for Purity", the singing of a hymn of praise (or penitence in Lent), and the Salutation and "Collect for the Day".  The opeining acclamation is season specific; the first one is for normal use, the second for use during the Easter Season, and the third for penitential seasons. The Acclamation is a form of greeting and sets the tone of the service by reminding worshipers that the worship of God is the focus of all that follows in the service. 
St Andrew's Episcopal Church
Lewisburg, PAA

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